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We understand that keeping our members informed about what is happening at ATC is an important part of the services we offer.

Please see below for our most recent news.

 

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ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL CLOSES ATC COVID CLINIC IN FORT MCMURRAY

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

(August 10, 2021, Fort McMurray, AB) – Athabasca Tribal Council (ATC) will be closing the ATC Covid Clinic on Wednesday, August 11th at 8:00 am. The clinic provided support to Indigenous Community Members, living in the Wood Buffalo region, who had been released from the hospital with COVID-19 and were at risk of experiencing symptoms that could worsen. As vaccination rates increase in the region the need for the ATC Covid Clinic is not necessary to support the communities.

“Providing support to our community members throughout the pandemic has been, and will continue to be our top priority,” said Karla Buffalo, CEO of Athabasca Tribal Council. “That being said, I am pleased to see that through vaccination and other public health measures, the need for additional health supports like the ATC Covid Clinic is not necessary as they once were.

The ATC Isolation Care Centers will remain open to serve community members and their families who have been exposed to or tested positive for COVID-19 and are not able to safely isolate themselves at home. For more information on how to access this support service please visit the ATC website at atcfn.ca.

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About ATC

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information, visit atcfn.ca.

 

ATC Office Contact Information:

Phone: (780) 791-6538
Email: info@atcfn.ca

For more information:

Karla Buffalo
Chief Executive Officer, Athabasca Tribal Council
karla.buffalo@atcfn.ca
Main Office Phone: (780) 791-6538


 

MEMORIAL WALK AND GATHERING IN SOLIDARITY SUPPORTED BY OVER 1000 PEOPLE AS THE FIRST NATIONS OF THE ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL DEMAND ACTION AGAINST OPPRESSION

July 8, 2021

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

(July 8, 2021, Fort McMurray, AB) – The five First Nation Chiefs representing the Athabasca Tribal Council (ATC), the Treaty 8 Grand Chief, and Métis leaders, walked into Fort McMurray in the Memorial Walk in Solidarity with the support of approximately 350 Indigenous community members and non-Indigenous supporters. The walk concluded at Snye Point Park. Well over 1000 people attended the Memorial Gathering in Solidarity throughout the day to listen and learn from Residential School survivors. Indigenous leaders demanded action from governments, churches and the public to create a better future for Indigenous people in Canada.

Indigenous leaders in attendance included the following:

  • Chief Allan Adam, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation and President, Athabasca Tribal Council
  • Chief Vern Janvier, Chipewyan Prairie First Nation
  • Chief Mel Grandjamb, Fort Mckay First Nation
  • Chief Ron Kreutzer, Fort McMurray 468 First Nation
  • Chief Peter Powder, Mikisew Cree First Nation
  • Arthur Noskey, Treaty 8 Grand Chief
  • Kendrick Cardinal, President Fort Chipewyan Metis Association

The Memorial Walk in Solidarity started at the Janvier Health Center on July 1 – Canada Day. Chief Vern Janvier and members of Chipewyan Prairie First Nation gathered to walk in memory of the Residential School survivors and the children who never made it home. Throughout the 130-kilometre route to the Snye River in Fort McMurray, the walk gained momentum, with supporters joining various legs of the journey. Dozens of community members provided support with food and water. The Athabasca Tribal Council supported the needs of the community members and took action to provide additional support, including teepees set up along the route providing a gathering place for the walkers to start and end their seven-day journey.

As the Memorial Walk in Solidarity gained momentum, the Athabasca Tribal Council called on the community and the public-at-large to join the walk and show support for the First Nations and Métis communities. They have suffered and continue to be affected by these atrocities. Many non-Indigenous supporters showed up throughout the walk to give our communities the strength they needed to continue and have hope for change in the near future.

The total effect of this support was felt at Snye Point park as the Memorial Walk in Solidary ended, and an estimated 1000 people from Wood Buffalo and beyond came to support our First Nations and Métis people as our Nations honoured the survivors and those lives lost at Residential Schools. The Athabasca Tribal Council set up three teepees, trappers tents and other event tents to host attendees and support the Indigenous community as they shared cultural knowledge, practices, and teachings to attendees who wanted to learn.

“I’m very proud of the ATC staff and our First Nation and Métis communities who all worked together to make this a true community event,” said Karla Buffalo, CEO of Athabasca Tribal Council. “This is a time when our community members are reliving the trauma of residential schools and we wanted those members to know that we hear them and believe them when they tell us of the abuse and trauma they experienced at residential schools.”

“When we look at the 94 Calls to Action, we see the systemic oppression that is actively held against our people,” said Chief Adam, President of the Athabasca Tribal Council. “In six years, only a handful of the 94 calls to action have been completed. The Indian Act still holds power over how our people are treated and how we live. There is no reconciliation without action. We intend to call upon the federal government to change the Indian Act. It must change for the benefit of all First Nations.”

High-resolution photos of the Memorial Walk in Solidarity and the Memorial Gathering in Solidarity are available to media below.

ATC Community Members who are in need of emotional support are encouraged to call the Athabasca Tribal Council’s IRS Support Worker, Lyn Chartrand, at 780-799-2461, Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. The National Indian Residential School Crisis Line at 1-866-925-4419 is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to all Indigenous people.

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About ATC

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information, visit atcfn.ca.

 

ATC Office Contact Information:

Phone: (780) 791-6538
Email: info@atcfn.ca

 

For more information:

Chief Allan Adam
President, Athabasca Tribal Council
Chief, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation
780-713-1220

 

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From left to right:

Kendrick Cardinal, President Fort Chipewyan Metis Association
Chief Peter Powder, Mikisew Cree First Nation
Arthur Noskey, Treaty 8 Grand Chief
Chief Mel Grandjamb, Fort Mckay First Nation
Chief Ron Kreutzer, Fort McMurray 468 First Nation
Chief Vern Janvier, Chipewyan Prairie First Nation
Chief Allan Adam, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation and President, Athabasca Tribal Council

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

STATEMENT FROM THE ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL CHIEFS FOR SUPPORT OF THE MEMORIAL WALK AND GATHERING IN SOLIDARITY AT SNYE POINT PARK

(July 6, 2021, Fort McMurray, AB

Our First Nation members have long-known the amount of abuse that our children experienced when taken to Residential Schools. These schools were built for the purpose of taking the Indian out of the child and for the purpose to take the children from the arms of their parents. It was a system to remove children from their ability to speak their language, from the ability to be able to be loved and nurtured by their community. It was done in a way that no parent today would accept and never should have happened in the first place. 

Much of the trauma and atrocities against our children was done by the hands of the Nuns and Priests by a system put in place by the government. Our children were hidden in unmarked graves and never returned home. The Chiefs of the Athabasca Tribal Council’s First Nations want a movement of healing to begin where our peoples' experiences are shared openly. 

It is only when the people of Canadian society truly listen to our experiences they will see that it is not hard to understand the level of abuse that was done in the name of the Church and how that still affects our societies today through the intergenerational trauma that continues as a result of the abuse and the deaths that occurred in Residential Schools. 

The five First Nation Chiefs of the Athabasca Tribal Council walk in unity with our Residential School Survivors and their families that were impacted and the children that never made it home. We ask the public of the Wood Buffalo Region to join our First Nations and Métis community as we walk in solidarity and as we share our stories to open the eyes and the hearts of Canadians to understand a brutal part of our Canadian history. 

The Chiefs call on our region to join them in walking in solidarity and attend the Memorial Gathering in Solidarity on Wednesday, July 7, at the Snye. 

Memorial Walk in Solidarity

  • Starting at 8:00 a.m. at Highway 69, walking along Highway 63. Then taking Prairie Loop Boulevard to Snye Point Park. Expected arrival between 10:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.

Community members who want to participate but cannot walk long distances are encouraged to follow in a vehicle. Please use cautions and be aware of your own safety at all times. Those who wish to stay overnight and bring their own tents are welcome.

Memorial Gathering in Solidarity

A Memorial Gathering in Solidarity will occur at Snye Point Park at approximately 11:00 a.m.

ATC will have a teepee and trappers tent set up for a small cultural village. Survivors will be sharing their experiences and Indigenous community members will be sharing knowledge and traditional practices with attendees. 

Bring your own lawn chairs and blankets as seating is limited. Everyone is asked to maintain physical distance or wear a mask to protect themselves, our Elders and communities from the COVID-19 virus. 

ATC Community Members who are in need of emotional support are encouraged to call the Athabasca Tribal Council’s IRS Support Worker, Lyn Chartrand, at 780-799-2461, Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. The National Indian Residential School Crisis Line at 1-866-925-4419 is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to all Indigenous people.

For more information:

Chief Allan Adam
President, Athabasca Tribal Council
Chief, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation
780-713-1220

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL SUPPORTS MEMORIAL WALK AND GATHERING IN SOLIDARITY AT SNYE POINT PARK

(July 5, 2021, Fort McMurray, AB) – The Athabasca Tribal Council (ATC) supports the community members of Chipewyan Prairie Déne First Nation (CPDFN) and Chief Vern Janvier as they participate in a Memorial Walk from the Janvier Heath Centre to Snye Point Park in Fort McMurray. The walk is to honour the Residential School Survivors and the thousands of children who didn't make it home. Dozens of community members, including youth and children, have been accompanying Chief Janvier on this walk. The community has been supporting walkers with water and food since its start on July 1.

Memorial Walk in Solidarity

Expected locations of the walk:

Monday, July 5: Starting at 8:00 a.m. in Anzac, walking along Highway 881 to Highway 63.

Tuesday, July 6: Starting at 8:00 a.m. at Highway 881, walking along Highway 63 to Highway 69 (YMM Airport turn-off)

Wednesday, July 7: Starting at 8:00 a.m. at Highway 69, walking along Highway 63. Then taking Prairie Loop Boulevard to Snye Point Park. Expected arrival between 10:00 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.

ATC encourages anyone from the public who would like to show support for our First Nations and Métis communities to join the walk as they make their way to Fort McMurray. Also, community members who want to participate but cannot walk long distances are encouraged to follow in a vehicle Wednesday as the group makes its way to Snye Point Park.

 

Memorial Gathering in Solidarity

A Memorial Gathering in Solidarity will occur at Snye Point Park at approximately 11:00 a.m. on Wednesday, July 7, 2021.

Community Members who have felt the impacts of the Residential School system are invited to come and share their experiences with those in attendance.

Members of the public who wish to listen and learn about the Residential School experience of our community are welcome to attend and continue their own personal reconciliation path during this event.

Participants and attendees are asked to maintain physical distancing or wear a mask to protect themselves, our Elders and communities from the COVID-19 virus.

"We hope to see you. We hope that the public will come out and support this walk and our collective healing," said Chief Adam, President of the Athabasca Tribal Council. "When the people march with us, that will give us the strength we need to carry on and to fight for a better life for our younger people, for the next generations."

ATC Community Members who are in need of emotional support are encouraged to call the Athabasca Tribal Council's IRS Support Worker, Lyn Chartrand, at 780-799-2461, Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. The National Indian Residential School Crisis Line at 1-866-925-4419 is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to all Indigenous people.

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ABOUT ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information, visit atcfn.ca.

 

For more information:

Chief Allan Adam
President, Athabasca Tribal Council
Chief, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation
780-713-1220

 

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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE JOINT STATEMENT WITH RMWB

THE ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL WILL ACKNOWLEDGE CANADA DAY AS AN OPPORTUNITY FOR INDIVIDUAL CANADIANS TO CONTRIBUTE TOWARDS RECONCILIATION

ATC-RMWB

(June 29, 2021, Fort McMurray, AB) – The Athabasca Tribal Council has engaged in discussions with the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo on Canada Day celebrations taking place July 1st.

The previous month has confirmed hundreds of unmarked children’s graves at the sites of former Canadian Indian Residential Schools; totalling 1323 graves—and that number will only continue to rise as more confirmations are made at more former school grounds.

International focus is on Canada for the crimes against Indigenous people by a system enacted by the same historical figures who founded Canada. With Canada Day fast approaching, there has been much debate amongst Indigenous and non-Indigenous groups on whether or not to cancel celebrations on July 1st.

“ATC is respectful of each individual and communities’ decision in regards to any recognition of the July 1st National Holiday,” said Chief Allan Adam, President of the Athabasca Tribal Council. “We recognize that each person grieves in different ways and that any celebration might upset some. It is our hope that on July 1st and beyond, people will take the opportunity to have an open dialogue about our past, present and future as both Indigenous and non-Indigenous people work together towards a stronger Canada.”

The Athabasca Tribal Council would like to see Canada Day in the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo go forward, with a strong emphasis on building a Canada that we want to see for future generations. It is paramount that Canadians of all backgrounds acknowledge the past that must never be forgotten so that we can move forward towards true reconciliation. On this Canada Day, ATC encourages all individuals to listen and learn about the history of Canada that has not been taught in schools. Read the Truth & Reconciliation report and the 94 calls to action. Wear orange, have discussions with your family and friends about how individually each of us can contribute to reconciliation.

Community-led Bring Our Children Home Healing Rally and Canada Day Parade

ATC and the RWMB will be supporting the community-led “Bring Our Children Home Healing Rally” which will begin at 10 a.m. at the Provincial building. This Healing Rally will be a march that will travel the Canada Day parade route along Clearwater Drive, in the opposite direction of parade attendees. This march will take place on foot, and vehicles will not be able to participate. This Healing Rally will honour every child that attended residential schools. Please maintain social distancing and public health measures. Community members can register to attend the Canada Day Parade in their vehicles at rmwb.ca/CanadaDay.

We ask that all community members wear orange in solidarity with Indigenous people in Canada. ATC will continue working together with the RMWB, creating more steps towards truth-telling, action and healing in our region and beyond.

“As we reflect on Canada Day and what it means to each of us, let’s use this day to listen and learn from each other, and the truth of this country's history, while taking action to strengthen our personal commitments to reconciliation. Regardless of how you choose to mark July 1, I encourage everyone to make this a thoughtful day, while reflecting on the traumatic legacy of the residential school system, and how we all can commit to meaningful reconciliation,” said Mayor Don Scott

Together we can build a future for Canada that we can all be proud of and celebrate.

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About ATC

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information, visit atcfn.ca.

FOR MORE INFO PLEASE CONTACT

Chief Allan Adam
President, Athabasca Tribal Council
Chief, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation
780-713-1220

Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo
Media@rmwb.ca


 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL DEMANDS PRIORITY ACTION IS GIVEN TO NATION-WIDE INVESTIGATIONS TO IDENTIFY THE GRAVES AND THE CRIMINAL ACTS AGAINST THE CHILDREN WHO ATTENDED INDIAN RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS

(June 24, 2021, Fort McMurray, AB) – Athabasca Tribal Council (ATC) continues to call on all levels of government—federal, provincial, and municipal—to prioritize actions to investigate the criminal acts that took place at each of the Indian Residential School locations across Canada.

“ATC acknowledges the work done to-date by the First Nations that have been able to identify the gravesites at Residential School areas so far,” said Karla Buffalo, CEO of Athabasca Tribal Council. “We send prayers and support to all those impacted by the residential school system, with special attention today to the Cowessess First Nation as their community absorbs the impact that this information will have on community members and survivors. ATC will continue to demand that the 94 recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission be actioned without further delay.”

Since the initial discovery and announcement on May 26, 2021, there have been 1143 unmarked graves of Indigenous children from across Canada including Kamloops-British Columbia, Brandon-Manitoba, Regina-Saskatchewan, Lestock-Saskatchewan, and Cowessess-Saskatchewan. Today’s tragic announcement of 751 unmarked graves at the former Marieval Indian Residential School in Saskatchewan will sadly not be the last. This discovery proves that a nation-wide investigation of all residential school sites is necessary to allow our communities to identify and grieve for loved ones and put their remains to rest.

“As we learn of more graves being found across Canada, it is more apparent than ever that our Elders and survivors need to be heard and action taken to find those who lost their lives at a residential school,” said Chief Adam, President of the Athabasca Tribal Council. “Canada can no longer turn a blind eye to atrocities and genocide that have taken place in this country. The world is watching Canada’s next steps. I call on this Canadian government to be better than any of their predecessors and take the actions needed for true and meaningful reconciliation.”

ATC Community Members who are in need of emotional support are encouraged to call the Athabasca Tribal Council’s IRS Support Worker, Lyn Chartrand at 780-799-2461, Monday to Friday 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. The National Indian Residential School Crisis Line at 1-866-925-4419 is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to all Indigenous people.

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ABOUT ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information, visit atcfn.ca.

For more information:

Chief Allan Adam
President, Athabasca Tribal Council
Chief, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation
780-713-1220


 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL CALLS FOR A NATIONAL INVESTIGATION TO IDENTIFY THE GRAVES AND THE CRIMINAL ACTS AGAINST THE CHILDREN WHO ATTENDED INDIAN RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS AND DIED AS A RESULT

(June 2, 2021, Fort McMurray, AB) – Athabasca Tribal Council (ATC) is calling on all levels of government—federal, provincial, and municipal—to immediately open robust and thorough investigations into the criminal acts that took place at each of the Indian Residential School locations across Canada, and to identify the graves of the Indigenous children who never returned home after being forcibly removed from their loving families and communities. ATC calls on the Government of Canada to provide additional supports to survivors and descendants of the residential schools. The intergenerational trauma that remains in Indigenous communities and families cannot be ignored.

The remains of 215 children found at the former Kamloops Indian Residential School on Tk’emlups te Secwépemc First Nation has highlighted the need for more investigations. ATC has and will continue to honour the memory of these children with others. This is one story of one school, today’s call to action is about all the Indian Residential School system’s atrocities that have never been fully and properly investigated as the criminal acts they are. The knowledge of mass graves that have been forgotten or hidden by the institutions that created them cannot be allowed to remain as the status quo in Canada. Indigenous peoples’ experiences and knowledge of these heinous crimes are supported by evidence that has deliberately been neglected to be uncovered. Action from all levels of government is needed to ensure the full truth is known and Canada is accountable to its history.

“The families of those children taken, the survivors, and their descendants have long known that the horrific experience of the residential school system resulted in the death of the children who never made it home,” said Chief Adam, President of the Athabasca Tribal Council and Chief of Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation. “The findings by the Tk’emlups te Secwépemc First Nation in Kamloops have only added to the evidence of the atrocities our people have been dealing with for generations. Now is the time to expose the full scope of the criminal acts of genocide against our people that still affect our communities today. Action must be taken to investigate the criminal acts inflicted against children.”

The damage that has been perpetrated against Indigenous people, culture, languages and communities will not remain unseen. Recovery and healing are the only steps forward for Indigenous community members. ATC calls on the federal government to increase the support that is available to Indian Residential School survivors and descendants. Supporting these community members is a necessary responsibility of the government’s reconciliation for the trauma inflicted under the Indian Residential School system.

ATC is willing to work with all levels of governments to undertake nation-to-nation solutions that impact and create meaningful change and support to Indigenous communities.

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ABOUT ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information, visit atcfn.ca.

 

For more information:

Elena Gould
Director of Education, Culture and Language
Athabasca Tribal Council
elena.gould@atcfn.ca
780-881-6137

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL OPENS ATC COVID CLINIC IN FORT MCMURRAY

(May 31, 2021, Fort McMurray, AB) – Athabasca Tribal Council (ATC) opened a COVID clinic on Sunday, May 30th, located in the parking lot of the Oil Sands Discovery Center in Fort McMurray. This clinic will provide support to Indigenous Community Members, living in the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo (RMWB), who have been recently released from the hospital with COVID-19 and are still experiencing symptoms that are at risk of worsening. The ATC Covid Clinic’s focus is to respond to the patient’s wellbeing as it relates to their COVID symptoms, offering patient-centred care that focuses on assessing the individual as a whole, beyond symptom treatment alone.

ATC has contracted Medika North, a local Indigenous owned and operated healthcare solutions service provider, to operate the ATC Covid Clinic, as well as the ATC Isolation Care Centers that have been in operation since April 2020.

The ATC Covid Clinic has 24-hour-a-day medical staff and medical equipment, including oxygen and IV fluid support, to assist with assessment, monitoring and recovery. If the patient’s condition worsens, the medical team will work with Alberta Health Services (AHS), Emergency Medical Services (EMS) and the Northern Lights Hospital to access urgent medical care. The ATC Covid Clinic medical staff are trained and prepared to provide emergency medical treatment if needed.

“The symptoms of COVID can be different for everyone, and our Community Members who have been assessed at the hospital may not require hospital admission but would like to be further assessed and monitored,” said Karla Buffalo, CEO of Athabasca Tribal Council. “ATC has created this temporary clinic to specifically support our Community Members with COVID symptoms who may be well enough to leave hospital but not feel comfortable to return home and provide self-monitoring when their health could rapidly change.”

The ATC Covid Clinic will be available to ATC First Nations members, Métis members, or a person living in the same household as a member, residing within the RMWB. To access the ATC Covid Clinic, the patient must have been assessed at the Northern Lights Hospital within the last 24-hours for symptoms related to COVID-19. The patient must have tested positive or is awaiting the results of a COVID-19 test.

Community members can access the ATC Covid Clinic by calling their community’s health contact between 8:30 am - 4:30 pm Monday to Friday. (listed below) If a community contact is not available or it is after hours, community members can call 587-645-9720.

“This is a difficult time for our region as our healthcare system struggles to keep up with this pandemic. It is important that our Community Members feel supported and have access to medical treatment if needed,” said Chief Adam, President of the Athabasca Tribal Council. “This ATC Covid Clinic will provide our Indigenous community with medical support and monitoring while not straining the health resources of our region further. Our number one priority is our Community Members’ health and wellbeing, ensuring there is a safe way to heal and recover from this virus”.

The ATC Covid Clinic will provide short term health monitoring of patients. If the patient is stable but requires assistance self-isolating with continued wellness checks, they may be referred to the ATC Isolation Care Center in Fort McMurray. If the patient’s symptoms worsen, the process to have the patient admitted to hospital will begin. Emergency medical treatment will be provided if needed.

COMMUNITY COVID SUPPORT CONTACTS FOR REFERRAL TO THE ATC COVID CLINIC

Available between 8:30 am - 4:30 pm Monday to Friday.

If the contact is unavailable, or it is after hours or weekends, call 587-645-9720.

 

Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation
Maggie Farrington, ACFN CEO
780-881-9341 Maggie.farrington@acfn.com

Chipewyan Prairie First Nation
Najwa Karamujic, CPDFN COVID-19 Support,
780-799-0999, nkaramujic@hotmail.com

Fort McKay First Nation
Denise Wilkinson, FMFN Health Director,
780-881-8277, dwilkinson@fortmckay.com

Fort McMurray 468 First Nation
Megan Plews, Health Director,
780-715-5957,
fmfnhealthdirector@FMFN468.com

Cindy Miller, Band Manager,
780-742-7503, cindy.miller@fmfn468.com

Mikisew Cree First Nation
Claudia Simpson
780-288-0622, Covid.support@mikisewcree.ca

Fort Chipewyan Métis Local #125
Tammy Riel,
306-231-3960, tammy.riel@fortchipmetis.ca

Fort McKay Métis Nation
Julie Stewart, Community Safety and Emergency Manager,
780-838-6228,
jstewart@fortmckaymetis.com

McMurray Métis Local #1935

Bev Milne, Office Manager,
780-742-7896,
bev.milne@mcmurraymetis.org

Katalin Loutitt, Administrative Assistant,
780-713-8803,
Katalin.loutitt@McMurrayMetis.org

Willow Lake Métis
Erica Cree, Community Engagement Coordinator,
780-215-1855, e.cree@wlmn.ca

Chard Métis Local
Pamela Herman, General Manager of Chard Metis
780-804-4008, gm@chardmetis.com

Conklin Métis
Verna Quintal-Janvier, Finance Officer for CRDAC
780-799-2915, vernaqj@crdac.ca

Valerie Quintal, Board of directors for CRDAC
780-714-0498, valerieq@crdac.ca

More information about how Community Members can access the ATC Covid Clinic and what to expect on arrival is available on the ATC website at www.atcfn.ca/our-services/health/covid19/atc-covid-clinic/

 

 

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ABOUT ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information, visit atcfn.ca.

For more information:

Chief Allan Adam
President, Athabasca Tribal Council
Chief, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation
780-713-1220

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LAP00002-sm

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CALLING ON THE GOVERNMENT OF ALBERTA TO RESCIND THEIR PROPOSED K-6 EDUCATION CURRICULUM

 May 20, 2021, Fort McMurray, AB – The Athabasca Tribal Council (ATC) is gravely concerned by the Eurocentric-American rhetoric in the K-6 education curriculum released on March 29, 2021. It has failed to meaningfully incorporate Indigenous perspectives, including the complete erasure of Treaties and Truth & Reconciliation references in the K-2 curriculum. Instead, it actively promotes oppression and intolerance, perpetuating systemic racism.

“This curriculum review process failed to incorporate Indigenous, as well as many other diverse perspectives,” said Chief Allan Adam of President of Athabasca Tribal Council and Chief of the Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation. “This curriculum is blatantly meant to sustain and bolster systemic racism in the next generation. The manner that the curriculum was developed and presented is disrespectful to all Albertans. This curriculum does not fulfill the commitments to truth and reconciliation and must be rescinded.”

In a letter to Alberta’s Premier and Minister of Education, ATC called for the following actions to be taken immediately:

  1. Reinstate the Curriculum Writing Groups and Teacher and Educator Focus Groups and ensure they reflect the diversity of the province they serve, including appropriate representation from Indigenous peoples, racialized peoples, women, Francophone and LGBTQ2S+ communities.
  2. Work in partnership with teachers, parents, the Government of Canada, Treaty 6, 7 & 8 Educators Alliance, and other Indigenous organizations to ensure the curriculum review processes are transparent and reflective of the contemporary classroom realities.

 

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ABOUT ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information, visit atcfn.ca.

FOR MORE INFO PLEASE CONTACT

Karla Buffalo
Chief Executive Officer, Athabasca Tribal Council
karla.buffalo@atcfn.ca
Main Office Phone: (780) 791-6538

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

“WE’RE ON OUR OWN”, INDIGENOUS COMMUNITIES OF THE RMWB CALLS FOR ALL FIRST NATION AND METIS FAMILIES TO PULL THEIR KIDS OUT OF NORTHLANDS SCHOOL DIVISION AFTER ALBERTA REFUSES TO INTERVENE

 

On April 28, 2021 the Indigenous communities of the RMWB met with Dr. Deena Hinshaw and Minister of Health, Tyler Shandro, to advocate for more action to curb the spread of COVID-19 within the region.

“In the midst of the worst COVID-19 outbreak in the country, the Indigenous communities of the RMWB begged Minister Shandro to implement changes to stop the spread of COVID-19,” said Chief Allan Adam. “After being told by Minister Shandro that despite a deadly surge there would be ‘no new measures to be considered’, we have no choice but to take measures into our own hands.”

“Effective immediately, the 11 Indigenous communities of the RMWB are instructing all First Nation and Metis citizens to pull their kids out of in-class learning at all Northland School division schools,” said Chief Adam. “We have been assured by Northland that your children will be able to continue learning remotely. This is not a measure we take lightly but it’s for the good of not just our people, but the whole region.”

Northland School division had asked Education Minister Adriana LeGrange to move to online learning and she refused. “As a result, we have no choice, if Alberta won’t take action to protect Indigenous families, we will have to do their job for them,” said Chief Adam.

“Why is it that Minister LeGrange agreed to close down the Public and Catholic school systems in Fort McMurray, but refused to do the same for the Indigenous and rural communities?” said President Kendrick Cardinal of the Fort Chipewyan Metis. This government can’t be counted on to protect Indigenous lives.”

“We presented our concerns and recommendations and one by one they shot them down” says Chief Adam, “All they did was say why they can’t do it, or say that its already being done. Well if they’re doing so much why isn’t it having an effect? Where are these isolation hotels? Where are the vaccines? Where are the ICU beds they promise? All they committed to was sending a newsletter, when has a newsletter ever saved someone’s life? If they can’t provide any of those measures to keep us safe then they have an obligation to implement a lockdown to stop the spread. But until then the Indigenous communities of the RMWB will act alone.”

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FOR MORE INFO PLEASE CONTACT

Chief Allan Adam
President, Athabasca Tribal Council
Chief, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation
780-713-1220

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

INDIGENOUS GROUPS OF THE REGIONAL MUNICIPALITY OF WOOD BUFFALO (RMWB) ACCUSE PREMIER KENNEY OF PRIORITIZING PROFITS OVER LIVES WITH HIS INCOMPETENT RESPONSE TO COVID-19

(FORT MCMURRAY, AB – April 26, 2021) - The eleven First Nation and Métis Nations of the RMWB are calling upon the province of Alberta to immediately change their approach to COVID-19.

“For almost thirteen months we have followed the leadership of Jason Kenney, and where has it gotten us?” asks Chief Adam. “To last place in the country when it comes to the rate of spread.  More than double the worst outbreak in Ontario and tied, if you can believe it, with Delhi, India. Whatever Alberta has been doing so far has been a failure,” states Adam.

The eleven RMWB Indigenous communities are calling for a new approach in the wake of record-setting outbreaks in the region, which recently claimed the life of a respected Métis elder who was denied treatment at Northern Lights Regional Health Centre twice in the week before he died.

“These losses are too great to bear, and something has to be done,” said President Kendrick Cardinal of the Fort Chipewyan Métis. “We cannot stand by and continue to watch these numbers surge, we must challenge the Provincial government to address our concerns now. We refuse to bury another Indigenous member of our communities.”

Since the beginning of the pandemic, the Indigenous communities of the RMWB have had to take measures into their own hands by setting up checkpoints or implementing curfews in order to protect their communities. The restrictions that the province has enacted are ineffective and show in rapidly growing case counts.

“We are at a crossroads as a society, if we look to our Indigenous communities in Wood Buffalo, we have done extensive work to protect our people. All levels of government need to take a hard look at our region and our communities as an example of best practices. Our biggest barrier today is the roll-out of the vaccines to the greater population and all age groups, while implementing temporary restrictions in the region until we can get our case numbers to a manageable point,” said Ron Quintal, President of the McKay Métis Nation.

“We have a Premier who is prioritizing profits over lives by continuing to allow infected workers to come to our region from all over the country to keep oil flowing,” said Chief Adam. “If this were any other region, the numbers would dictate that we would be shut down.  If it were any other industry, the province would have put in increased regulations just like they did with the meat packers, or schools, or the NHL.  But no, Premier Kenney is willing to bet the lives of your family and mine, all so the oil fat cats can continue to get big dividend payments.”

The Premier’s nonchalant attitude to illness and death is mirrored in the comments of local UCP MLA Tany Yao, who rose in the legislature on April 22, 2021, to say that “we should accept that death happens, and that people have to take self-responsibility.”

When elected officials believe this is appropriate commentary during a regional crisis, it becomes clear that they no longer can be entrusted to make the very life-and-death decisions that are required to protect the health and safety of the Indigenous people of the region.

“We have had over a year to prepare for this, and right from the start the Indigenous communities have been warning of precisely this scenario,” said Chief Adam.  “The Province’s plan has failed pure and simple. What’s worse is Premier Kenney has denied that he is a failure and has gone as far as to blame Indigenous people for the increased spread in the RMWB at an April 26th press conference.”

Says Adam: “That is a lie, plain and simple.  If that were true, you would have massive outbreaks in the rural hamlets and smooth sailing in the urban area.  Look at the numbers, that’s just not the case.   And the reason for that is because the Indigenous communities took measures into our own hands to protect our people.  Kenney could have done the same, but even after a year, has chosen not to. And who does that hurt? The residents of the RMWB.”

In the desperate hope that Premier Kenney will listen to reason, the Indigenous communities of the RMWB have forwarded a letter including these recommendations and requests:

  • Declare a stay-at-home order, with essential movement outside the home only.
  • Establish isolation units in local hotels for people to be able to quarantine in safety and comfort.
  • Establish a mass vaccination program for everyone over 18 to stop the spread.
  • Establish and expand rapid testing sites at all points of entry to the community to help locate the virus and prevent entry into the community.
  • Establish and staff a field hospital to deal with the shortage of beds and health care workers.
  • Restrict business to essential services only. No more patios – pick-up and delivery only.
  • Implement a community-wide curfew.
  • Erect checkpoints at the entrance to all hamlets to restrict entry to residents and essential services only, including flights to Fort Chipewyan.
  • Move immediately to online learning only for Northland School Division schools in the region.
  • Enforce mask and social gathering bylaws and ticket violators.

Says Adam: “These are all actions that have been implemented in jurisdictions that have fared better than we have, and they are proven effective.  Maybe Kenney could try some of these out for a change. Literally, anything would be better than what he has been doing. Our region is losing the battle with COVID-19, and we cannot accept the lack of meaningful action and response any longer.”

 

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FOR MORE INFO PLEASE CONTACT

 

Chief Allan Adam
President, Athabasca Tribal Council
Chief, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation
780-713-1220

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL ANNOUNCES CANCELLATION OF 2020 CULTURAL FESTIVAL DUE TO COVID-19 PANDEMIC

(July 7, 2020, Fort McMurray, AB) – Athabasca Tribal Council has announced the cancellation of the 2020 Cultural Festival due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“After careful consideration, and out of utmost concern for the safety and well-being of community members, our Board of Directors has made the difficult decision to cancel this year’s anticipated Cultural Festival,” said ATC CEO Karla Buffalo.

Originally scheduled for September 10-13, 2020, the Indigenous arts and cultural festival was gearing up to once again showcase, celebrate, and foster the development of Northern Alberta’s diverse and distinctive First Nations arts and culture, building on the success of last year’s extraordinarily well-received inaugural festival.

“Above all else, ensuring the health and well-being of our communities is our number one priority,” said ATC President, Chief Allan Adam. “We must base our decisions and plans for the coming months with that in mind.”

The 2019 Cultural Festival presented by Syncrude was a huge success with community attendance over 5,000 in three days.

“It was so exciting to see so many people, gathering together to celebrate the beautiful arts and culture and traditional cultural practices of our region’s Dene, Cree, and Métis people,” said Chief Allan Adam. “We look forward to hosting the Cultural Festival again once the COVID-19 pandemic has passed.”

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About ATC

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information, visit atcfn.ca.

Media Contact

Karla Buffalo
Chief Executive Officer, Athabasca Tribal Council
karla.buffalo@atcfn.ca
Main Office Phone: (780) 791-6538

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL’S STATEMENT ON OPPRESSION SUFFERED BY INDIGENOUS PEOPLES OF CANADA

(June 30, 2020, Fort McMurray, AB) – Recent articles involving Premier Kenney’s speechwriter, Paul Bunner, bringing to light his history of opinions on the Indigenous people and the residential school system should concern all Albertans. The facts of the oppression suffered by the Indigenous peoples of Canada have been well documented by the Government of Canada through the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. International organizations such as Amnesty InternationalHuman Rights Watch, and the UN Human Rights Committee have all called on Canada to make fundamental changes to laws and policies concerning the treatment of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples. The history of Canada’s treatment of Indigenous peoples is not a debate, it is a fact, and must be treated as such by all levels of government if we are to move forward with reconciliation.

“The first step to solving any problem is admitting there is a problem to begin with,” said Karla Buffalo, CEO of the Athabasca Tribal Council. “The comments by Premier Kenney’s speechwriter Mr. Bunner clearly show a fundamental lack of understanding of the systematic oppression laid against Indigenous people through the atrocities of the residential school system. It is deeply concerning that someone in Mr. Bunner’s position, as a key architect of the messaging distributed by the Government of Alberta, would dispute well-documented facts.”

Bunner’s opinions outlined in various articles cannot be allowed to influence the direction or shape of communications of the Government of Alberta, no matter how subtle or limited Premier Kenney believes that influence to be. The lived experiences of generations of First Nations who were stripping their families, culture, heritage, and identity is documented fact and cannot be disputed. Further, the atrocities of the residential school system should not be dismissed because others also suffered their own atrocities. This type of argument detracts from the importance of addressing these situations as criminal. All Canadians need to take the steps necessary towards justice and reconcile to never let any of these horrors happen again. The crimes committed by the residential school system and the effects on Indigenous people and culture are still experienced today through the trauma suffered by individuals and the loss of cultural knowledge denied survivors stolen from their communities.

“Without leadership being the embodiment of change, acts of racism and oppression will continue,” said Chief Allan Adam, ATC Board of Director President. “We must hold our leaders and governments to account. Opinions that deny the facts of the systemic Indigenous cultural genocide cannot be allowed to influence governments or leadership, no matter how small.”

The Athabasca Tribal Council will continue to advocate for the end of oppression and racism against Indigenous people.

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About ATC

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information, visit atcfn.ca.

Media Contact

Karla Buffalo
Chief Executive Officer, Athabasca Tribal Council
karla.buffalo@atcfn.ca
Main Office Phone: (780) 791-6538

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL CALLS ON THE GOVERNMENT OF ALBERTA TO REINSTATE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORTING

(June 5, 2020, Fort McMurray, AB) – During the Covid-19 pandemic, the Government of Alberta enacted various orders in the “interests of the public”. On March 30 and March 31, 2020, Minister Jason Nixon issued three orders; namely, Orders 15/2020, 16/2020, and 17/2020.

Orders 15/2020 and 16/2020 defers submission deadlines for compliance reports under the Technology Innovation and Emission Reduction Regulation and the Renewable Fuels Standard Regulation from March 31st to June 30, 2020.

Order 17/2020 completely suspends reporting requirements for approvals and registrations issued under the Environmental Protection and Enhancement Act, for licenses and approvals under the Water Act, and disposition requirements under the Public Lands Act. The Order does not indicate whether these reports will be submitted later. The Orders are in force until August 14, 2020, unless the Ministry of Environment and Parks or the Lieutenant Governor in Council terminates it earlier.

As President of the Athabasca Tribal Council Ltd., our First Nations are deeply disappointed with the actions of the Government of Alberta in enacting these Orders. Many First Nations reside in close proximity to the oil sands operations in Fort McMurray and Fort Chipewyan. We are disproportionately affected by the environmental impacts of these operations. These environmental impacts also negatively impact our ability to exercise our treaty rights to hunt, trap, fish and gather. Yet, the Government of Alberta failed to consult with us as to how these Orders may impact our communities.

We find no comfort in having to rely on voluntary reporting. The health and safety of our people and the environment is a major concern. A concern the Government of Alberta does not appear to share. If the Government of Alberta wishes to sustain a meaningful relationship with the Indigenous peoples of Alberta, then we recommend that Indigenous perspectives are included when making decisions that will be significantly impacting Indigenous people and communities.

Considering that the state of public health emergency will not be renewed on June 15, 2020, we call on the Government of Alberta to immediately terminate these Orders, rather than waiting for them to expire August 14, 2020.

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For more information:
Karla Buffalo | CEO, Athabasca Tribal Council
Contact: karla.buffalo@atcfn.ca

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL ADVOCATES THE END OF OPPRESSION AND RACISM

(June 5, 2020, Fort McMurray, AB) – The Athabasca Tribal Council (ATC), representing First Nations communities within the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo, advocates for the end of oppression and racism against Indigenous people. The YMM Solidarity March, taking place this Saturday, June 6th, to bring awareness to ending systemic racism against Black, Indigenous, People of Colour (BIPOC), reinforces our common goal.

The actions of the police in Minneapolis, USA, that led to the death of George Floyd are unacceptable. ATC stands in solidarity with the black community and all who condemn racism and violence against BIPOC. The oppression of Indigenous people in Canada has been persistent and a deliberate violation of human rights, as documented in the Reclaiming Power and Place report from the National Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls, and unfortunately continues today.

“As we watch events and protests unfold all over the world, we need to remember that systemic racism and violence happens right here in our country, communities, neighbourhoods, and streets,” said Chief Allan Adam, ATC Board of Directors President. “Canada needs to take the steps necessary towards changes that will heal the devastation in Indigenous communities, but those steps must be taken by every individual Canadian if we are to heal as a country. When we raise awareness in our communities, we can continue the conversations, bring about actions that further change, and heal our communities, our nations, our country, and the world as a whole. We extend our thanks to the organizers of the YMM Solidarity March for working to shine a spotlight on systemic racism and the impact it has not only on the world but also on our own communities.”

ATC supports peaceful and non-violent activism that brings awareness to oppressions and advocates for change, but during this time of pandemic, the need to protect our communities from the spread of COVID-19 cannot be overlooked. It is vital that all participants in the YMM Solidarity March take appropriate precautions to protect themselves and others from spreading COVID-19.

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For more information:
Karla Buffalo | CEO, Athabasca Tribal Council
Contact: karla.buffalo@atcfn.ca

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL ESTABLISHES ISOLATION FACILITY IN FORT CHIPEWYAN

(May 15, 2020, Fort McMurray, AB) – Athabasca Tribal Council (ATC), in partnership with Nunee Health Board Society, Mikisew Cree First Nation, Athabasca Chipewyan First Nation, Fort Chipewyan Métis Association, First Nations and Inuit Health, and Indigenous Services Canada have established an isolation facility in the hamlet of Fort Chipewyan. This isolation facility will provide a safe isolation option to all community members, both Indigenous and Non-Indigenous, who have tested positive or have symptoms of COVID-19, and may not have the ability to safely self-isolate.

“It is important that anyone with COVID-19 symptoms self-isolate immediately to keep themselves, their family members, and the rest of the community safe,” said Karla Buffalo, CEO of Athabasca Tribal Council. “ATC understands that self-isolation can present challenges for individuals, and the Fort Chipewyan Isolation Facility will be there to support all community members in the area who need assistance.”

Located at the Dene Cree Inn, the Fort Chipewyan Isolation Facility has 10 rooms for community members. Medical staff will be on-site over the weekend preparing the facility for operations starting next week. The isolation facility will provide safe and clean rooms, medical supports, meals and other amenities necessary for individuals to safely isolate if they have COVID-19 or are symptomatic. The on-site medical professionals have been in self-isolation prior to working at the Fort Chipewyan Isolation Facility and will remain in isolation during their stay, ensuring the safety of the community. Healthy meals and snacks will be delivered to each room three times per day.

“The need to protect our community from this pandemic is the responsibility of every individual, but no one should feel alone in this responsibility. First Nations communities are built on a strong community connection and this isolation facility is here to provide support to everyone in the area, ensuring the health and safety of the community as a whole,” said Chief Allan Adam, ATC Board of Director President. “We remain prepared to support our communities through this pandemic with every resource we can make available, should we need them.”

Outline of the process at the Fort Chipewyan Isolation Facility:

  1. Community members should call Nunee Health Centre at 780-697-3650 if they have any symptoms of COVID-19, including cough, fever, shortness of breath, runny nose or sore throat. Nunee Health Centre will provide phone and/or home assessments for COVID-19 testing, as required.
  2. Nunee Health Centre will complete an Isolation Facility Referral Form for the community member if they are unable to safely or adequately self-isolate and are awaiting test results, or have tested positive for COVID-19. Community members should discuss with Nunee Health their circumstances and how they plan on self-isolating or if they require assistance. (For example, if someone in the household has health concerns that would increase the risk of complications from COVID-19, or if they are unable to isolate in a portion of the house away from others to prevent the spread to the rest of their family).
  3. Nunee Health Centre and Medical Transportation will process the referral and medical professionals will prepare to receive the community member at the Fort Chipewyan Isolation Facility.
  4. On arrival at the Fort Chipewyan Isolation Facility, community members will be met by medical professionals and provided Personal Protective Equipment (PPE). The individual will be taken to their room and will be interviewed by a medical staff member about their health, meal selections and other needs during their stay.
    • The community members will receive three meals a day and healthy snacks. All will be delivered by the medical staff to their room.
    • In each room, a wellness activity package will be provided.
  5. During their stay, community members will be required to follow all procedures and processes in place at the Fort Chipewyan Isolation Facility for the health and safety of themselves, the medical staff, and the community.
    • No visitors will be permitted.
    • Procedures for using PPE, cleaning, changing of linens, and interactions with medical staff will be provided and must be followed.
    • Extra linens and cleaning supplies with medical-grade cleaners will be provided to wipe down surfaces that the individual touches regularly.
  6. Upon discharge, the room will be comprehensively sanitized by medical staff, including extensive cleaning procedures for linens and all surfaces within the room.

The Fort Chipewyan Isolation Facility is the second isolation facility managed by ATC. An Urban Isolation Facility with 40 rooms was previously set-up in Fort McMurray and is available to the five ATC First Nations should any community members need assistance. For more information on the Urban Isolation Facility, visit http://atcfn.ca/athabasca-tribal-council-sets-up-urban-isolation-facility-during-covid-19-pandemic/.

ATC encourages all members to continue to stay safe by practicing physical distancing, staying home, and staying connected virtually with family members, loved ones, and friends.

 

 

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For more information:
Chief Allan Adam | President, Athabasca Tribal Council

Contact: aadam@acfn.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL SETS UP URBAN ISOLATION FACILITY DURING COVID-19 PANDEMIC

(April 22, 2020, Fort McMurray, AB) – Athabasca Tribal Council (ATC) has set up an urban isolation facility for the five First Nation communities during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The health and wellbeing of our communities is a top priority at ATC.” said Karla Buffalo, CEO of the Athabasca Tribal Council. “Each community is working to support their members, whether at home, or in additional facilities during the pandemic. This urban isolation facility is an extra measure to help serve the regional communities.”

The isolation facility, managed by ATC, has 26 units and is equipped with medical staff, security, and meal support.

“This urban isolation facility was initiated as a result of leadership to add additional support for our communities,” said ATC Board of Director President, Chief Allan Adam. “Each community has their own Emergency Response Plan (ERP), and intends to continue to support members on reserve, however this is an additional resource available if needed.”

Each First Nation will need to complete a referral form on behalf of community members who may require isolation due to COVID-19 to determine if they are approved to be moved to the facility. The First Nation communities will work together with the ATC Health Department to process intakes.

ATC encourages all members to continue to stay safe by practicing physical distancing and by staying home, as well as staying connected virtually with family members, loved ones, and friends.

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About ATC

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information, visit atcfn.ca.

For more information:

Chief Allan Adam | President, Athabasca Tribal Council 

aadam@acfn.com

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL’S OFFICE WILL BE CLOSED BUT OPERATIONS WILL CONTINUE DURING THE CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

(March 16, 2020, Fort McMurray, AB) – Due to the increased risk of community transmission, Athabasca Tribal Council is taking extraordinary precautionary measures to ensure the health and wellbeing of our communities, team members, and their families. Be advised that effective Tuesday, March 17, 2020 our office will be closed to the public until the COVID-19 community transmission risk level decreases. All of our team members will all be working remotely and will be available to connect with you by phone, email, or video messaging. 

Supporting the ATC First Nations is our top priority, and our team will continue to work to ensure that we are able to continually deliver our services remotely. ATC will ensure that our essential services in Medical Transportation, Child Family Services and support to Post Secondary and High School Boarding Home students will continue.

“ATC is committed to providing services to the communities we serve while doing our part in the prevention of the spread of this pandemic,” said Karla Buffalo, CEO of Athabasca Tribal Council.

All upcoming ATC events have been cancelled and ATC will be utilizing remote work technologies to host staff meetings and briefing sessions. We want to ensure Community Members know that they can continue to contact ATC by calling our main line at 780-791-6538 during business hours, phones are being forwarded to staff as they work remotely, and emails will continue to be responded to. After hours and essential service support phone numbers remain the same and are listed below.

Essential Service Contact Information:

Edmonton Medical Transportation
1-800-514-7106

Child & Family Services On Call
587-645-3437

Child & Family Services Crisis Unit
1-800-638-0715

ATC Office Contact Information:

Phone: (780) 791-6538
Email: info@atcfn.ca

We encourage Community Members to review the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) information on our website at http://atcfn.ca/our-services/health/covid19/ daily, as we continue to update this information as it becomes available.

We will continue to actively monitor our social media pages and respond to comments and messages in a timely manner.
Facebook: @AthabascaTribalCouncil.ATC |  Twitter: @AthabascaTC

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About ATC

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information, visit atcfn.ca.

For more information:

Karla Buffalo
Chief Executive Officer, Athabasca Tribal Council
karla.buffalo@atcfn.ca
Main Office Phone: (780) 791-6538



 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

ATHABASCA TRIBAL COUNCIL OPERATIONS UPDATE DURING CORONAVIRUS PANDEMIC

(March 12, 2020, Fort McMurray, AB) – Out of an abundance of caution, the Athabasca Tribal Council (ATC) will be scaling down daily operations until further notice. This precaution is being taken to limit the potential spread of the novel coronavirus, COVID-19. All community events that are hosted by ATC will be postponed until further notice. This operational change will allow our team to focus on providing essential services to the communities we serve during this time of potential outbreak in our region.

“The health and well-being of our Community Members and staff is our number one priority,” said Karla Buffalo, CEO of Athabasca Tribal Council “Our staff are committed to supporting our community members with essential services while taking reasonable and measured steps to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.”

Meetings scheduled with ATC staff will be moved to telephone or video conferencing. If an in-person meeting is required, ATC has developed a protocol that will be implemented prior to the meeting to determine the risks to both parties to ensure the health and safety of all involved. Essential services will still be operational, phone calls and emails will continue to be responded to.

We encourage Community Members to review the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) information on our website at http://atcfn.ca/our-services/health/covid19/ daily, as we continue to update this information as it becomes available.

We will continue to actively monitor our social media pages and respond to comments and messages in a timely manner. Facebook: @AthabascaTribalCouncil.ATC |  Twitter: @AthabascaTC

Essential Service Contact Information:

Edmonton Medical Transportation
1-800-514-7106

Child & Family Services On Call
587-645-3437

Child & Family Services Crisis Unit
1-800-638-0715

ATC Office Contact Information:
Phone: (780) 791-6538
Email: info@atcfn.ca

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About ATC

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information, visit atcfn.ca.

For more information:

Karla Buffalo | CEO, Athabasca Tribal Council
Contact: karla.buffalo@atcfn.ca | 780.715.8113



 

Athabasca Tribal Council announces new cultural festival taking place in
September 2019

(Fort McMurray, AB - August 22, 2019) Athabasca Tribal Council has announced a new Indigenous arts and cultural festival happening on September 19-21, 2019 at Snye Point Park that will showcase, celebrate, and foster the development of Northern Alberta’s diverse and distinctive First Nations arts and culture.

“We will be hosting Indigenous artists and performers from the region’s First Nations, along with guest artists for three days of spectacular arts and cultural programming,” says Karla Buffalo, CEO of Athabasca Tribal Council. “This will be a gathering and celebration that welcomes all cultures.”

The 2019 inaugural three-day festival will include 20+ workshops and seminars for artists and the public, 100+ local, national, and international Indigenous artists and performers, an exhibition gallery and gift shop featuring work by local and national artists, a round dance and tea dance with a community feast, artist demonstrations and cultural presentations, and mainstage shows featuring a headliner act and regional performers.

“The Festival truly values the importance of engaging the entire Wood Buffalo region in our quest to shine a light on the creative spirit of our First Nations,” Elena Gould, Director of Education, Culture & Language says. “This will both be an important community event, and a new cultural tourism attraction for Wood Buffalo.”

The Athabasca Tribal Council 2019 Cultural Festival has a number of corporate and community partnership opportunities available. For more information about these, or the Festival in general, contact Elena Gould at 780-881-6137 or visit www.atcculturalfestival.ca.

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About ATC

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information visit atcfn.ca.

To arrange media interviews or for more information please contact:

Elena Gould
Director of Education, Culture and Language, Athabasca Tribal Council
elena.gould@atcfn.ca
Phone: 780.791.6538 ext. 261 | Cell: 780.881.6137

First-ever Athabasca Tribal Council Golf Classic in conjunction with Oil Sands Trade Show announced

(Fort McMurray, AB - July 30, 2019) On Monday, September 9, 2019, the Athabasca Tribal Council Golf Classic will be held at the Miskanaw Golf Club in conjunction with the annual Oil Sands Trade Show.

This partnership between ATC and EventWorx will provide an exciting opportunity to raise funds for ATC’s Post-Secondary Student Support Program.

“These funds will provide needed financial support to ATC students,” says Athabasca Tribal Council Chief Allan Adam. “This will enable them to gain access to post-secondary education, and to graduate with skills needed to pursue their dreams and individual careers.”

Registration is $295 + GST for individuals, and $1,180 + GST for a team of four. Fees include 18 holes of golf at the gorgeous Miskanaw Golf Club, power cart, on-the-course BBQ lunch, banquet dinner, and lots of great prizes!

“We are very pleased to work with the Athabasca Tribal Council to form a new partnership through the creation of the Athabasca Tribal Council Golf Classic,” Wes Scott, President and CEO of EventWorx Corporation says. “This is an investment in community, and will provide much-needed scholarship funding to support Indigenous youth in earning their post-secondary education.”

For more information about sponsorship opportunities, or to register a team, contact Elena Gould at 780-881-6137 or through email at elena.gould@atcfn.ca.

Athabasca Tribal Council is an organization that serves our First Nations by providing relevant and innovative programs and services that enrich the well-being, health and prosperity of its people. ATC is committed to ensuring the protection of inherent rights, Treaty Rights, and their Traditional Territories while respecting the autonomy of each Nation. For information visit atcfn.ca.

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To arrange media interviews or for more information please contact:

Elena Gould

Director of Education, Culture and Language

Athabasca Tribal Council

elena.gould@atcfn.ca

Cell: 780.881.6137

Phone: 780.791.6538 ext. 261

Click here to access the ATC Golf Classic sponsorship package

 

Athabasca Tribal Council, Athabasca River Métis, and Nistawoyou Association Friendship Centre release the results of their project: Rebuilding Resilient Indigenous Communities – Assessing the Indigenous Impacts of the Horse River Wildfire  

Click here to access the Wildfire Research Press Release

Generous Donation to ATC from PICL Management, Former ATC Funding Recipient

Click here for more details about this generous donation